Embracing Failure.

So now that we’ve been properly introduced, I guess it’s time to dive in.

Failure. This blog will be about a great deal of failure. The subtitle of this blog is ‘papering the wall with rejection letters,’ this is in reference to what F. Scott Fitzgerald was said to have done when he was just getting started as a writer. He was faced with so many rejection letters that he could paper his walls with them, and he did. Every day he would have been faced head on with his failure, and every day he would have kept going. And eventually, after many many drafts of his debut novel This Side of Paradise, he was finally published, and the rest is history.

Failure is not a setback, it is not a roadblock, failure is a speed-bump. Failure tells you to slow down, but never to stop moving. As Americans today, it seems as if we have a certain adversity to failure; ‘failure’ seems like a bad word almost. But it hasn’t always been this way. In the past, failure was looked upon as a necessary step on the way to success, and not as a dead end. So now, through this blog, together, we will embrace failure, more specifically, my failure. My fifty submissions of this book alone, my eighteen outright rejections, my three glints of hope, and my twenty-nine non-response rejections. But I’m going to edit this book again, and then I’m going to submit it again. And no matter what, I will embrace failure and I will celebrate it. But hopefully I won’t have to for all that much longer.

-T

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6 thoughts on “Embracing Failure.”

  1. I appreciate the title of your blog and the point of view since unfortunately failure on some level, when you’re trying to achieve, is inevitable, and we just have to get through it. Which is not easy and I think ends up stumbling some people.

    Your novel does sound interesting (even though I am not a millennial 🙂 )and I look forward to keeping up with the progress. I have a perception that the publishing industry is much different than it use to be, but I have no idea if that is accurate so this is like a tutorial. I also enjoyed the link to the famous rejection letters and discovering Dave Grohl is addicted to caffeine.

    It’s hard to believe those rejection letters are legitimate, although they do a nice job of showing just how much more frustrating the rejections can be when based on things like ! .

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  2. Millenial Fish is a curious title. Is its significance something you would wish to become clear after (or during) reading your book, or would you be comfortable explaining its significance to someone who has yet to read your book? I’m especially interested if your title is meant to be some sort of encapsulation of the ideology or narrative, as many titles seem to be, or if it is meant to be something else entirely.

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    1. Thank you for your comment and your interest; the title is indeed something that is both meant to be eye catching as well as significant to the narrative (and explained therein). A brief explanation is that the novel centers around three Millennial characters and contains a motif throughout that saving one fish out of hundreds still makes all the difference in the wold to that one fish (i.e. even helping just one person in the face of large injustices can still make a difference).

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  3. WOW. Those rejection letters were FANTASTIC.

    I think you have a very healthy and positive outlook on failure. I think it can be one of the most educating experiences and really beneficial to the creative/writing process because of the way it does slow you down. It makes you aware of the quality and intention of what you are writing. I’m excited to hear more about how the publishing process works and how it has changed your perspective on the writing process.

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